2019-09-13T10:12:15-04:00 September 13th, 2019/Mindset/By /

Mindset: You’ll Never Feel Like You’re Ready

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It was the Summer of 2003 – three months before I was going to enter university.

I had one goal that summer – to put on as much muscle as possible.

Why did it matter so much?

I didn’t like being “the skinny guy” in high school, and I didn’t want to be known as that for the next four years.

Gaining muscle sounds simple enough, right? You eat a ton of food, and you go to the gym a few times a week.  

There was one problem – I didn’t feel like I was ready to go to the gym yet.

I needed more time to prepare for the gym!

What does that mean? 

  • I wanted to work out at home first and build some muscle before going to the gym.
  • I needed to research the best workout programs.
  • I needed to research the right form and technique for each lift.

Why did I feel this way?

It was a combination of insecurity, uncomfortableness, and the fear of the unknown. 

I had an image built up in my head of what going to the gym would be like.

I’d be surrounded by in-shape people who would make fun of me, “Wow, what’s that guy doing at the gym? He has no idea what he’s doing!

I think I watched too many TV shows where people would make fun of the “fat” guys at the gym.

Well, I had to suck it up because I didn’t have “time” to get ready. I went to the gym anyway.

At first, I only went at 9 pm every single night because I didn’t want anyone watching me work out. But then the Gas Station put me on evening shifts, so I had to get my workouts in during the prime time. 

Here’s what happened: No one cared. No one laughed at me. 

I messed up my forms and techniques during the first few times. One person saw me and came over and helped me correct the method.

Everything that I feared was going to happen was made up in my head.

I ended up gaining 25lbs that summer.

I had no idea what I was doing initially – but I figured it out along the way.

There’s No Perfect Plan

I’ve seen countless people get excited about affiliate marketing, but they quit before they ever launch a campaign.

One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned in life is to get started as soon as you get the idea. It’s called the “speed of implementation” – how fast can you execute on a plan.

What happens with most people is they want to research, research, and research. They want to spend months reading blogs and forums before they actually launch a campaign.

It’s a way for people to feel as if they’re making progress – without actually putting in real work or taking risks.

The more they research without making any progress, the more they overanalyze. It gets to a point where they convince themselves it’s not a great idea anymore and they bounce to the next bright shiny object.

Or they want to wait until they feel like “they’re ready.” They want to work more to save money,  or maybe they’ll read some books or study copywriting.

That’s what my friend did in 2009.

He wanted to start an affiliate marketing campaign, but it wasn’t the right “time.” Work was busy and it should slow down in the Summer.

Well, life’s not predictable like that. He got promoted that summer which gave him even more work. Then his girlfriend got pregnant at the end of the year.

Now he feels as if he has too much responsibilities and commitments to try and become an entrepreneur.

There’s never a perfect time – the time is now.

As soon as I heard about affiliate marketing, I took action that same day.

I had no idea what the fuck I was doing. I had no experience, no mentors, and I barely had I budget. But I let my excitement of what was possible overpower my fears.

Everyone says to “think big.” I’m going to be honest – I don’t like that advice. When I think big – I intimidate and scare myself. Instead, I break down my goals into the smallest actions possible.

Don’t pressure yourself to make $10,000 within a few months. Do you know how to register a domain name? Do that, and do it as well as possible. Then figure out the next brick to master.

Being an entrepreneur is like jumping off a cliff and trusting yourself to build a parachute on the way down.

You don’t need a mentor. Very few people have one when they first start; it shouldn’t be a bottleneck. 

You don’t need an exact blueprint on what to do in every single situation. That comes with experience.

There is no magic moment in the future where you’ll feel ready. You’ll never feel ready, so you might as well start now.

The best way to learn is to take direct action. Direct action means spending time shooting the basketball. Indirect effect means going shopping to find the best basketball clothes and shoes. Which one will get you further?

Don’t worry about the hundred things you have to do. In any given moment, there’s only one best move to make. You’ll deal with future problems when the future is here. 

You’ll make far more progress taking action and making a mistake than sitting there trying to come up with the perfect plan.  

There are things out there that seem intimidating. Facts: No one was borning knowing how to do X. Everyone that’s an expert at X was a beginner who figured it out. 

There are people out there far more successful than you, who started with less confidence and fewer resources. You don’t have any excuses.

Hard is good. The harder something is, then the more rewarding it is. The harder something is then the less competition you’ll have in the long term – everyone wants easy.

Trust that you’ll figure it out along the way. I promise that you’re smarter than you think you are. 

 

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